Last week brought us many interesting events with a wedding, a book publishing, birthdays, and deaths. Read more about this week in literary history.

From Brontë to Waters: Last Week in Literature
From Brontë to Nemerov: Last Week in Literature
Photo by Thomas Kelley on Unsplash

Last Week in Literature

June 29 – Charlotte Brontë Marries Arthur Bell Nicholls

Last Week in Literature: Charlotte Brontë Marries Arthur Bell Nicholls
Last Week in Literature: Gone With The Wind is Published.
Photo from Biography

Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity or registering wrongs.

Charlotte Brontë was a writer known for literary classics such as Jane Eyre. On this day in 1854, the writer married Arthur Bell Nicholls. Fun fact: Brontë’s father decided not to attend the wedding. This literary event lasted nine months, until Brontë’s death on March 31, 1855.

June 30 – Gone With The Wind is Published

Last Week in Literature: Gone With The Wind is Published
Last Week in Literature: Gone With The Wind is Published.
Photo from Amazon

Burdens are for shoulders strong enough to carry them.

The writer Margaret Mitchell published literary classic, Gone With the Wind, on this day in 1936. This book even received the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. Gone With the Wind is loved by many and was even turned into a film. This book is a staple of literary history.

July 1- George Sand’s Birthday

Last Week in Literature: George Sand's Birthday
Last Week in Literature: George Sand’s Birthday.
Photo from Britannica

There is only one happiness in life, to love and be loved.

George Sand was born on this day in 1804. Sands was the pseudonym of Amantine-Lucile-Aurore Dudevant, née Dupin, a French female novelist. This writer is known for her french romantic novels. Some of her famous literary works include A Winter in Majorca and La Mare au Diable. All of her books drew on personal experiences.

July 2 – Jean-Jacques Rousseau Dies

Last Week in Literature: Jean-Jacques Rousseau Dies
Last Week in Literature: Jean-Jacques Rousseau Dies.
Photo from Brittanica

Jean-Jacques Rousseau died July 2, 1778 due to a stroke. Rousseau was a Swiss born writer and philosopher. His role in literature’s history is indisputable.

What wisdom can you find that is greater than kindness?

This figure in literary history influenced the ideals of the French Revolution and the Romantic generation. His writing included political works such as The Social Construct and books such as The New Eloise and Émile.

July 3 – Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Birthday

Last Week in Literature: Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Birthday
Last Week in Literature: Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Birthday.
Photo from Biography

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born on this day in 1860 in Hartford, Connecticut. Perkins is known for being an American humanist, an advocate for social reform, and a writer.

The role of the artist is to ask questions, not answer them.

She wrote poetry, short stories, and nonfiction. Her most famous works include The Yellow Wallpaper and Herland. Her literary prowess didn’t end there. She also published a magazine, The Forerunner, growing her ideas and feminism.

July 4 – Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Birthday

Last Week in Literature: Nathaniel Hawthorne's Birthday
Last Week in Literature: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Birthday.
Photo from Brittanica

Nathaniel Hawthorne, famous writer, was born on this day in 1804.

No man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true.

This American writer is known for his short stories and romantic works. His literature also often included history, morality, and religion. Some of his famous literary works include The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables

July 5 – Howard Nemerov Dies

Last Week in Literature: Howard Nemerov Dies
Last Week in Literature: Howard Nemerov Dies.
Photo from Poetry Foundation

American poet Howard Nemerov died on this day in 1991 due to cancer. This writer is known for the diversity of his literary works.

I’ve never read a political poem that’s accomplished anything. Poetry makes things happen, but rarely what the poet wants.

He was named the United States Poet Laureate twice, once from 1963 to 19464, and again from 1988 to 1990. He was also the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Award for Poetry, and the Bollinger Prize.


Which day of Last Week in Literature did you find most interesting?