If you called Alagaësia your home, you’re not alone. But, if you’re ready to dive back into Eragon’s world with this new book, you might face some disappointment from Paolini himself.

Cover for the Eragon follow-up by Christopher Paolini.
Cover for the Eragon follow-up by Christopher Paolini.
Image from Amazon.

I have a confession to make. At 21 years old, I still want to be a dragon rider.

Before reading the latest Eragon book, I was ready to grab my dragon-riding saddle and take to the skies once more.

The Fork, The Witch, and the Worm by Christopher Paolini killed that passion. Here’s why.

Eragon's story, from the first book to the fourth.
Eragon’s story, from the first book to the fourth.
Photo from Books2Door.com

I expected Paolini’s lush description or dramatic storytelling. Instead, the book starts with Eragon…sitting. And reading.

This lack of engagement—and excitement—continues for nearly the entire book.

Compare Eragon’s opening line:

The wind howled through the night, carrying with it a scent that would change the world.

…to The Fork’s opening:

The day had not gone well.

Dear Christopher Paolini, what happened with this book?

Eragon and Saphira (from the unspeakable 2006 Eragon movie).
Eragon and Saphira (from the unspeakable 2006 Eragon movie).
Gif from Pinterest.

After seven years of waiting for a new book, we’re gifted with folklore. This doesn’t sound too bad…at first.

But, Paolini’s folklore strays away from Eragon’s scope. We’re introduced to characters whose names I still can’t remember.

Instead of filling in the gaps of all we’ve missed since Eragon’s departure from Alagaësia, Paolini passively explains Urgal history. For 100+ pages.

An Urgal from Eragon. Or, my face after reading this book.
An Urgal from Eragon. Or, my face after reading this book.

While each Eragon book felt cohesive, this book meanders. I yearned for the old Paolini, one whose books kept me captivated, instead of boring me in seconds.

Excuse my bitterness. I just hope The Fork is a segue to a much thicker Eragon volume. A book devoted to all the characters we’ve loved and missed.

I seriously doubt crossing off chores is the most exciting thing that’s happened to Eragon since he set sail from Alagaësia.

At least, I hope so.


What’s your take on Paolini’s new book? What do you love about Eragon, and wish there was more of in this book? Which book should I review next? Let me know!