If you live in an apartment with little to no outdoor space, gardening may seem impossible! Keep reading to learn how to turn your garden dream into reality.

Apartment gardening allows you to get creative with the space you have
Apartment gardening allows you to get creative with the space you have.
Image by Amardeep Singh from Unsplash

Growing an amazing garden has always been a dream of mine. I’ve wanted an enormous yard, growing every fruit and vegetable possible. Right now, I live in an apartment with no room for a huge garden, but that doesn’t stop me from growing plants!

Knowing how to use your space and really packing in green space can be healthy and fun. Adding plants to beautify your living spaces is encouraging and beautiful. It does not take as much work as you might think.

Apartment gardening can be simple, you just need to know a few things before beginning. I’ve spent the last few months researching and growing apartment friendly plants; both edible and non-edible. After this article, you will be eager to start your garden!

Apartment-Appropriate Plants

Not every plant is suitable for growing in small spaces.
Not every plant is suitable for growing in small spaces.
Image by Markus Spiske from Unsplash

Growing your own food is a great way to save money at the store, but not everything is suitable for an apartment. Before you grow fruits and veggies, look into the plants and where they grow best. For example, root vegetables grow undergrown and often need a lot of room. You shouldn’t grow potatoes or carrots if you have limited space that cannot hold large containers. Food that grows from trees is also not the wisest choice. I really want to grow a little lemon tree, but I also know how impractical this is. There is no room inside or outside my apartment for a tree.

Don’t be discouraged by this; there are still tons of things to grow! If you don’t have an outdoor area, herbs are a great choice. Many herbs can grow right on the kitchen counter. They add a bit of color to the kitchen, and you can easily snip off leaves to use while cooking. Since there are tons of plants you can grow, you might not know all of them. Try using this plant dictionary to explore all the possibilities!

You don’t have to only grow food, though. An apartment may seem small and dull, but house plants can help refresh the room. Here are some non-edible plants for apartments.

  • Snake Plant
  • Aloe Vera
  • Dieffenbachia 
  • Peace Lilly
  • Pothos

Helpful Products to Buy

Drying my own herbs helps cut the cost of buying prepackaged ones.
Drying my own herbs helps cut the cost of buying prepackaged ones.
Photo by Jacqueline Zalace

If you live in an apartment with no outside source of water, you definitely need a watering can! When I first started growing different plants, I used cups. I would fill a cup up in the kitchen, and then walk outside and water my plants. This was a bit time consuming because I had to go back and forth a few times. Watering cans at stores around me seemed too big or too expensive, so I never purchased it. My number one recommendation for a small watering can that you can easily store. The can is small and cute enough to use as decoration too.

For planters and pots, make sure to get a container the right size. A quick tip I often use is to recycle the plastic containers plants originally come in. For example, I bought a large pot for a flower plant, but instead of buying another pot for my basil, I used the large plastic pot. It doesn’t look bad, and it gets the job done.

While searching for the perfect pot, you may also see options with a built-in draining system. They work fine, but there is a cheaper option that uses less plastic. The area around my apartment has a rock bed, so when I am planting something, I grab a bunch of rocks and line the bottom. This helps water drain without building up at the bottom.

Sustainable Options

Instead of buying plastic sticks for tomato plants, I just used a stick from outside.
Instead of buying plastic sticks for tomato plants, I just used a stick from outside.
Photo by Jacqueline Zalace

If you have plants that need sticks or cages to grow along, try finding plastic-free options. There are bamboo sticks available online, but you can also use sticks from around your apartment. In the picture above, you can see my tomato plant tied to a stick I found outside. It’s not the fanciest, but I cut the use of plastics by using something that was already around me.

You may also notice that some pots are expensive. If you are feeling creative, try buying cheap terracotta pots and painting them yourself. This will add some uniqueness to your garden!

A lot of websites emphasize using excellent fertilizer. You can purchase fertilizer from stores, but you can make your own too. Recently, I have been using coffee grounds as fertilizer and it works great! I drink a few cups of coffee a day from my Keurig. A while ago, I switched to a reusable k-cup to cut down on plastic waste, so I go through a lot of coffee grounds now. I save the grounds in a mason jar and then use it at fertilizer later.

Re-growing from the Grocery

For these plants, I used bell pepper seeds from the grocery store.
For these plants, I used bell pepper seeds from the grocery store.
Photo by Jacqueline Zalace

Store-bought plants seem convenient, but they aren’t always the best option. Plants that are already growing can cost more money than a pack of seeds. If you are looking for the ideal money-saver, try growing fruits and vegetables from food scraps!

Above, you can see some bell peppers I have planted. A few months ago, I saved seeds from a bell pepper. I rinsed the seeds and let them dry before planting them the next day. I wasn’t entirely sure how they would turn out, so I planted them in tofu containers until they grew bigger. I eat tofu on a weekly basis and had a leftover container, so it was perfect. I am not sure how these peppers will turn out, but it is so exciting for them to grow bigger every day.

A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness; it teaches industry and thrift; above all it teaches entire trust.

Gertrude Jekyll

Many veggies can be regrown from the store. Earlier this summer, I challenged myself to regrow garlic. I didn’t want to waste soil on something that might turn out well, so I started the garlic in a mason jar filled with water. Eventually, the garlic began sprouting, and I moved it to a larger pot with soil. Plants are resilient, encouraging, and beautiful. Add them to any space and enjoy the view!


Remember, you can grow whatever you want! I try to grow herbs and veggies that I will use in cooking, but feel free to grow anything! Do you have a garden? Drop a comment below about tips and tricks you know that aren’t mentioned here.