When you have allotted time or room to film in, it’s easy to forget things. That’s when your plans unravel. These 7 items can save your film set from falling apart.

These pieces of equipment could save your set from absolute filming chaos.
These pieces of equipment could save your set from absolute filming chaos.
Photo by KAL VISUALS on Unsplash

1. Gaffers Tape

Gaffer’s tape (or Gaff Tape) is used on almost every film set. The beauty of gaff tape is that it doesn’t leave sticky residue the same way duct tape does, and it doesn’t tear off paint. That’s important on a set full of expensive filming equipment. Gaff tape is durable and serves a lot of purposes. Tape the hazardous cords to the floor. Set a mark for your actor. Fix a colored gel to your light.

You can also tear off a small piece of gaff tape, stick it to the front of your memory card and write what scenes are on it. It saves a lot of time when you’re looking for specific footage. Bring a lot of gaff tape to set. It’s the answer to a lot of filming problems.

2. Extra Memory Card

You should always have extra memory cards while filming. Get as much footage as you can. This is an item that should not be left behind. Guard it closely. Imagine getting home and realizing you don’t have all your memory cards. That’s an enormous deal!

Keep your memory cards in a safe spot on set, and task someone with watching them. They’re small and can easily get lost. Bring extra just in case you’re lucky enough to get great footage all day long, or in case you need to re-shoot something.

3. Pens

Pens are great for making notes in the script, or keeping track of what you filmed. This is another item that is small and can get easily lost. It’s not as important as a memory card, but without notes, filming could go wrong fast.

You should task someone on set with keeping a shot log or (camera log). A shot log shows which shots were winners, what needs to be filmed again, and any special filming notes. This can help with editing. Just make sure to have a pen, so the crew can keep a shot log on set. It’s helpful for on-the-go filming.

Equipment needs to be taken care of, even in on-the-go situations. Make your set ideal for filming.
Equipment needs to be taken care of, even in on-the-go situations. Make your set ideal for filming safely.
Photo by Vanilla Bear Films on Unsplash

4. Batteries

When you’re constantly using your equipment, batteries will run low fast. Bring a lot of batteries to set with you! Your overworked camera might overheat under the strain and cause batteries to drain in less than an hour. If you’re filming a 10 hour day, you can see the need for extra batteries.

It’s not only your camera that will drain your batteries, but your other pieces of equipment on set too. Filming can take its toll. Batteries seems to take the hardest hit. Always pack a ton of batteries when you’re filming on-the-go to keep your equipment working.

5. Extension Cords

Everyone seems to forget about extension cords until they’re filming outside, with no outlets near them. You don’t want your shot to be compromised because you can’t move your camera away from the wall. You need freedom when you’re filming, extension cords can help you with that.

It’s likely you’ll have a lot of equipment on set for filming. You will center all of that equipment around your subject to create the perfect shot. You’ll need a lot of extension cords and might even consider bringing a surge protector to set. This will protect your equipment and your set.

When your key equipment only goes so far, you need backup equipment to help you on set.
When your key equipment only goes so far, you need backup equipment to help you on set.
Photo by Jakob Owens on Unsplash

6. Small Toolbox for Set

You never know when you’ll need tools. Things break on film sets. Sometimes a piece of equipment needs to be fixed in the moment. You should have a tool kit on set just in case something like that happens while you’re filming. It also comes in handy for setting up tripods and making sure cameras are level. Here are a few items you should include in your toolbox.

  • Screwdriver
  • Pocket Knife
  • String
  • Flashlight
  • Allen wrench Set
  • Multi-tool
  • Clamps
  • Level

For more information on what to pack in your toolbox, visit Premium Beat.

7. Extra Copies of your Script for Filming

While you’re filming, the crew and cast will want to know where they are in the script and what’s required of them. They will spread out your few copies of the script fast. Make sure you bring extra copies of your script so you don’t spend time waiting for your turn to read the script.

Your script could also be lost or damaged during filming. I had an incident where our script fell into a lake while filming, and the words smeared across the page. Everyone had to resort to looking up the digital file on their phones. It was a major waste of filming time. Always bring extra copies of your script to set.

Are there any other pieces of equipment to bring to set? Let us know in the comments below. We would love to hear what items have saved you while filming.